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Nepal Medical Abortion

Resources

Latest resources from across the federation and our partners
Gender Masculinities Sexual Health in South Asia front cover IPPF
Resource

| 23 November 2016

Gender Masculinities Sexual Health in South Asia

This study on gender, masculinity and Sexual and Reproductive Health in South Asia sets out to examine ‘gender’ in its proper sense as a relationship between men and women, and the impact of cultures of masculinity upon sexual health of both men and women. The study suggests that cultures of masculinity impact upon the health of both men and women and that SRH programmes must explicitly address this aspect. Cultures of masculinity also have a direct relationship to sexuality and there are different ways in which this impacts upon the sexual rights of women-an aspect that the study also explores.

Gender Masculinities Sexual Health in South Asia front cover IPPF
Resource

| 23 November 2016

Gender Masculinities Sexual Health in South Asia

This study on gender, masculinity and Sexual and Reproductive Health in South Asia sets out to examine ‘gender’ in its proper sense as a relationship between men and women, and the impact of cultures of masculinity upon sexual health of both men and women. The study suggests that cultures of masculinity impact upon the health of both men and women and that SRH programmes must explicitly address this aspect. Cultures of masculinity also have a direct relationship to sexuality and there are different ways in which this impacts upon the sexual rights of women-an aspect that the study also explores.

Resource

| 11 October 2016

Cultural barriers to change - Bangladesh

In Bangladesh more than 60% of young women are married before they turn 18. This film follows Nipa, who was forced into marriage as a schoolgirl. Why? She brought shame on her family by talking to a boy.

Resource

| 11 October 2016

Cultural barriers to change - Bangladesh

In Bangladesh more than 60% of young women are married before they turn 18. This film follows Nipa, who was forced into marriage as a schoolgirl. Why? She brought shame on her family by talking to a boy.

Resource

| 11 October 2016

Women's Voices: India

This is the story of Bhakti who, after discovering she was pregnant decided to have an abortion, just like millions of other women around the world. Bhakti, who lives in India, shares her experience of why she decided to have an abortion, what her experience was like, and why access to safe abortion is so important for women in India. “I had mixed feelings. I was sad because the pregnancy ended, but I was also relieved because, thanks to the clinic, my difficulties were over.”

Resource

| 11 October 2016

Women's Voices: India

This is the story of Bhakti who, after discovering she was pregnant decided to have an abortion, just like millions of other women around the world. Bhakti, who lives in India, shares her experience of why she decided to have an abortion, what her experience was like, and why access to safe abortion is so important for women in India. “I had mixed feelings. I was sad because the pregnancy ended, but I was also relieved because, thanks to the clinic, my difficulties were over.”

Financial Statement 2015 cover
Resource

| 17 June 2016

Financial Statement 2015

IPPF’s total income has fallen by US$10.0 million from US$126.2 million to US$116.2 million. This reduction is due to a fall in unrestricted government income of US$5.8 million, a reduction of restricted government income of US$6.2 million and reduced donations in kind of US$0.6 million offset by an increase in restricted grants from multilaterals of US$4m with the balance of US$0.9 million decrease in other income and trading activities. The total decrease is split between restricted and unrestricted funds by US$2.3 million and US$7.6 million respectively. With the exception of Norway and Japan, all government (more significantly Australia and Sweden) donors have held level or increased their unrestricted funding to IPPF in the donor currency. However the strengthening of the US dollar has had a significant impact, effectively reducing US dollar unrestricted income by approximately 14% on a like for like basis compared to 2014. Total expenditure has decreased from US$137.5 million to US$131.8 million. Unrestricted expenditure has risen from US$84.2 million to US$85.6 million while restricted expenditure has fallen from US$53.3 million to US$46.2 million. The increase in unrestricted expenditure is driven by an exchange loss (US$1.9 million) and the use of US$8.9m designated funds to provide support in a number of areas: support in South Asia for system strengthening (US$2.3m); support for resource mobilization at regional and central level (US$1.5 million); campaign and advocacy for UN Liaison office (US$0.9 million); scale up fund for SGBV support to MAs (US$0.5 million); contingency spend on various activities (US$0.4 million). Restricted expenditure levels are driven by the timing of donor funded programmes, which vary on a year-by-year basis. This has resulted in an unrestricted net operating expenditure of US$13.4 million before other unrecognized gains and losses and a restricted deficit of US$2.1 million, to generate a total operating deficit of US$15.6 million. After taking into account actuarial gain on the defined benefit pension scheme and investment losses the resulting net movement in funds was a reduction of US$13.6 million. The level of unrestricted income received was approximately US$4 million less than forecast primarily due to the strength of the US dollar versus donor currencies and the expenditure in excess of income levels was funded using approved designated funds (US$2m million). This resulted in a decrease in general reserves to US$21.9 million and a fall in designated reserves to US$73.3 million.

Financial Statement 2015 cover
Resource

| 17 June 2016

Financial Statement 2015

IPPF’s total income has fallen by US$10.0 million from US$126.2 million to US$116.2 million. This reduction is due to a fall in unrestricted government income of US$5.8 million, a reduction of restricted government income of US$6.2 million and reduced donations in kind of US$0.6 million offset by an increase in restricted grants from multilaterals of US$4m with the balance of US$0.9 million decrease in other income and trading activities. The total decrease is split between restricted and unrestricted funds by US$2.3 million and US$7.6 million respectively. With the exception of Norway and Japan, all government (more significantly Australia and Sweden) donors have held level or increased their unrestricted funding to IPPF in the donor currency. However the strengthening of the US dollar has had a significant impact, effectively reducing US dollar unrestricted income by approximately 14% on a like for like basis compared to 2014. Total expenditure has decreased from US$137.5 million to US$131.8 million. Unrestricted expenditure has risen from US$84.2 million to US$85.6 million while restricted expenditure has fallen from US$53.3 million to US$46.2 million. The increase in unrestricted expenditure is driven by an exchange loss (US$1.9 million) and the use of US$8.9m designated funds to provide support in a number of areas: support in South Asia for system strengthening (US$2.3m); support for resource mobilization at regional and central level (US$1.5 million); campaign and advocacy for UN Liaison office (US$0.9 million); scale up fund for SGBV support to MAs (US$0.5 million); contingency spend on various activities (US$0.4 million). Restricted expenditure levels are driven by the timing of donor funded programmes, which vary on a year-by-year basis. This has resulted in an unrestricted net operating expenditure of US$13.4 million before other unrecognized gains and losses and a restricted deficit of US$2.1 million, to generate a total operating deficit of US$15.6 million. After taking into account actuarial gain on the defined benefit pension scheme and investment losses the resulting net movement in funds was a reduction of US$13.6 million. The level of unrestricted income received was approximately US$4 million less than forecast primarily due to the strength of the US dollar versus donor currencies and the expenditure in excess of income levels was funded using approved designated funds (US$2m million). This resulted in a decrease in general reserves to US$21.9 million and a fall in designated reserves to US$73.3 million.

Financial Statement
Resource

| 17 June 2015

Financial Statement 2014

Financial Statements for 2014 Executive Summary IPPF’s total income has fallen by US$10.0 million from US$136.1 million to US$126.1 million. This reduction is due to a fall in unrestricted government income of US$2.2 million, a reduction of restricted government income of US$8.0 million and reduced donations in kind of US$2.2 million offset by an increase in restricted grants from multilaterals of US$2.9 million. The total decrease is equally split between unrestricted and restricted income at US$5 million each. With the exception of Australia, all government donors have held level or increased their unrestricted funding to IPPF in the donor currency. However the strengthening of the US dollar has had a significant impact, effectively reducing US dollar unrestricted income by approximately 9% on a like for like basis compared to 2013. Total expenditure has risen from US$132.8 million to US$137.6 million. Unrestricted expenditure has risen from US$76.8 million to US$84.3 million while restricted expenditure has fallen from US$56.0 million to US$53.3 million. The increase in unrestricted expenditure is driven by an exchange loss (US$3.6 million) and the use of designated funds to provide support in a number of areas: support in South Asia for system strengthening (US$1.7 million); provision of support to Member Associations (MAs) to scale up services (US$0.9 million); development of the new strategic framework (US$0.4 million); international advocacy and supporting IPPF Vision 2020 campaign to place sexual reproductive health (SRH) and rights at the centre of the sustainable development agenda (US$0.8 million); and support for resource mobilization at a regional and central level (US$1.4 million). Restricted expenditure levels are driven by the timing of donor funded programmes, which vary on a year-byyear basis. This has resulted in an unrestricted deficit of US$4.6 million before other unrecognized gains and losses and a restricted deficit of US$6.9 million, to generate a total operating deficit of US$11.5 million. After taking into account actuarial losses on the defined benefit pension scheme the resulting net movement in funds was a reduction of US$15.1 million. The level of unrestricted income received was as forecast in the 2014 budget and the expenditure in excess of income levels was funded using approved designated funds (US$6.4 million). This resulted in a small increase in general reserves to US$24.0 million and a fall in designated reserves to US$85.9 million.   "The unrestricted funding that our major donors have provided to us over the long term has enabled the Federation’s Member Associations to build sustainable programmes of delivery and advocacy impacting positively the lives of millions of people."

Financial Statement
Resource

| 17 June 2015

Financial Statement 2014

Financial Statements for 2014 Executive Summary IPPF’s total income has fallen by US$10.0 million from US$136.1 million to US$126.1 million. This reduction is due to a fall in unrestricted government income of US$2.2 million, a reduction of restricted government income of US$8.0 million and reduced donations in kind of US$2.2 million offset by an increase in restricted grants from multilaterals of US$2.9 million. The total decrease is equally split between unrestricted and restricted income at US$5 million each. With the exception of Australia, all government donors have held level or increased their unrestricted funding to IPPF in the donor currency. However the strengthening of the US dollar has had a significant impact, effectively reducing US dollar unrestricted income by approximately 9% on a like for like basis compared to 2013. Total expenditure has risen from US$132.8 million to US$137.6 million. Unrestricted expenditure has risen from US$76.8 million to US$84.3 million while restricted expenditure has fallen from US$56.0 million to US$53.3 million. The increase in unrestricted expenditure is driven by an exchange loss (US$3.6 million) and the use of designated funds to provide support in a number of areas: support in South Asia for system strengthening (US$1.7 million); provision of support to Member Associations (MAs) to scale up services (US$0.9 million); development of the new strategic framework (US$0.4 million); international advocacy and supporting IPPF Vision 2020 campaign to place sexual reproductive health (SRH) and rights at the centre of the sustainable development agenda (US$0.8 million); and support for resource mobilization at a regional and central level (US$1.4 million). Restricted expenditure levels are driven by the timing of donor funded programmes, which vary on a year-byyear basis. This has resulted in an unrestricted deficit of US$4.6 million before other unrecognized gains and losses and a restricted deficit of US$6.9 million, to generate a total operating deficit of US$11.5 million. After taking into account actuarial losses on the defined benefit pension scheme the resulting net movement in funds was a reduction of US$15.1 million. The level of unrestricted income received was as forecast in the 2014 budget and the expenditure in excess of income levels was funded using approved designated funds (US$6.4 million). This resulted in a small increase in general reserves to US$24.0 million and a fall in designated reserves to US$85.9 million.   "The unrestricted funding that our major donors have provided to us over the long term has enabled the Federation’s Member Associations to build sustainable programmes of delivery and advocacy impacting positively the lives of millions of people."

publication cover
Resource

| 06 May 2015

IPPF's Strategic Framework: 2016-2022

  Strategic Framework 2016–2022 is a bold and aspirational vision of what the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) plans to achieve, and how we will achieve it, over the next seven years. It is the culmination of an extensive global consultative process involving Member Associations, partners and donors, and was approved by IPPF’s highest decision-making body, the Governing Council, in November 2014. Our strategy responds to social, political and demographic global trends. These include: the expectations and potential of the largest ever generation of young people; ongoing, significant social and economic inequalities, including discrimination against girls and women; and opposition that threatens gains in human rights. It is also guided by evaluations and analyses of our work – strengths, weaknesses, capacities, resources and networks. IPPF’s Strategic Framework sets the priorities that will allow the Federation to deliver impact as a sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) movement over the next seven years. It will guide national Member Associations and partners in formulating their own country-specific strategies, based on their resources and tailored to serve the most marginalized groups in local contexts. It also provides focus to the Secretariat in its international influencing and in its support to Member Associations. Progress in delivering the Strategic Framework will be measured through a dashboard of global results and Member Associations will report on these indicators on an annual basis. With this essential tool, IPPF is equipped to move forward and deliver on its promises. At the helm of the sexual and reproductive health and rights movement, we will help unite the actions and achievements of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) champions around the world to realize a step change in sexual and reproductive health and rights around the world.

publication cover
Resource

| 06 May 2015

IPPF's Strategic Framework: 2016-2022

  Strategic Framework 2016–2022 is a bold and aspirational vision of what the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) plans to achieve, and how we will achieve it, over the next seven years. It is the culmination of an extensive global consultative process involving Member Associations, partners and donors, and was approved by IPPF’s highest decision-making body, the Governing Council, in November 2014. Our strategy responds to social, political and demographic global trends. These include: the expectations and potential of the largest ever generation of young people; ongoing, significant social and economic inequalities, including discrimination against girls and women; and opposition that threatens gains in human rights. It is also guided by evaluations and analyses of our work – strengths, weaknesses, capacities, resources and networks. IPPF’s Strategic Framework sets the priorities that will allow the Federation to deliver impact as a sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) movement over the next seven years. It will guide national Member Associations and partners in formulating their own country-specific strategies, based on their resources and tailored to serve the most marginalized groups in local contexts. It also provides focus to the Secretariat in its international influencing and in its support to Member Associations. Progress in delivering the Strategic Framework will be measured through a dashboard of global results and Member Associations will report on these indicators on an annual basis. With this essential tool, IPPF is equipped to move forward and deliver on its promises. At the helm of the sexual and reproductive health and rights movement, we will help unite the actions and achievements of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) champions around the world to realize a step change in sexual and reproductive health and rights around the world.

Gender Masculinities Sexual Health in South Asia front cover IPPF
Resource

| 23 November 2016

Gender Masculinities Sexual Health in South Asia

This study on gender, masculinity and Sexual and Reproductive Health in South Asia sets out to examine ‘gender’ in its proper sense as a relationship between men and women, and the impact of cultures of masculinity upon sexual health of both men and women. The study suggests that cultures of masculinity impact upon the health of both men and women and that SRH programmes must explicitly address this aspect. Cultures of masculinity also have a direct relationship to sexuality and there are different ways in which this impacts upon the sexual rights of women-an aspect that the study also explores.

Gender Masculinities Sexual Health in South Asia front cover IPPF
Resource

| 23 November 2016

Gender Masculinities Sexual Health in South Asia

This study on gender, masculinity and Sexual and Reproductive Health in South Asia sets out to examine ‘gender’ in its proper sense as a relationship between men and women, and the impact of cultures of masculinity upon sexual health of both men and women. The study suggests that cultures of masculinity impact upon the health of both men and women and that SRH programmes must explicitly address this aspect. Cultures of masculinity also have a direct relationship to sexuality and there are different ways in which this impacts upon the sexual rights of women-an aspect that the study also explores.

Resource

| 11 October 2016

Cultural barriers to change - Bangladesh

In Bangladesh more than 60% of young women are married before they turn 18. This film follows Nipa, who was forced into marriage as a schoolgirl. Why? She brought shame on her family by talking to a boy.

Resource

| 11 October 2016

Cultural barriers to change - Bangladesh

In Bangladesh more than 60% of young women are married before they turn 18. This film follows Nipa, who was forced into marriage as a schoolgirl. Why? She brought shame on her family by talking to a boy.

Resource

| 11 October 2016

Women's Voices: India

This is the story of Bhakti who, after discovering she was pregnant decided to have an abortion, just like millions of other women around the world. Bhakti, who lives in India, shares her experience of why she decided to have an abortion, what her experience was like, and why access to safe abortion is so important for women in India. “I had mixed feelings. I was sad because the pregnancy ended, but I was also relieved because, thanks to the clinic, my difficulties were over.”

Resource

| 11 October 2016

Women's Voices: India

This is the story of Bhakti who, after discovering she was pregnant decided to have an abortion, just like millions of other women around the world. Bhakti, who lives in India, shares her experience of why she decided to have an abortion, what her experience was like, and why access to safe abortion is so important for women in India. “I had mixed feelings. I was sad because the pregnancy ended, but I was also relieved because, thanks to the clinic, my difficulties were over.”

Financial Statement 2015 cover
Resource

| 17 June 2016

Financial Statement 2015

IPPF’s total income has fallen by US$10.0 million from US$126.2 million to US$116.2 million. This reduction is due to a fall in unrestricted government income of US$5.8 million, a reduction of restricted government income of US$6.2 million and reduced donations in kind of US$0.6 million offset by an increase in restricted grants from multilaterals of US$4m with the balance of US$0.9 million decrease in other income and trading activities. The total decrease is split between restricted and unrestricted funds by US$2.3 million and US$7.6 million respectively. With the exception of Norway and Japan, all government (more significantly Australia and Sweden) donors have held level or increased their unrestricted funding to IPPF in the donor currency. However the strengthening of the US dollar has had a significant impact, effectively reducing US dollar unrestricted income by approximately 14% on a like for like basis compared to 2014. Total expenditure has decreased from US$137.5 million to US$131.8 million. Unrestricted expenditure has risen from US$84.2 million to US$85.6 million while restricted expenditure has fallen from US$53.3 million to US$46.2 million. The increase in unrestricted expenditure is driven by an exchange loss (US$1.9 million) and the use of US$8.9m designated funds to provide support in a number of areas: support in South Asia for system strengthening (US$2.3m); support for resource mobilization at regional and central level (US$1.5 million); campaign and advocacy for UN Liaison office (US$0.9 million); scale up fund for SGBV support to MAs (US$0.5 million); contingency spend on various activities (US$0.4 million). Restricted expenditure levels are driven by the timing of donor funded programmes, which vary on a year-by-year basis. This has resulted in an unrestricted net operating expenditure of US$13.4 million before other unrecognized gains and losses and a restricted deficit of US$2.1 million, to generate a total operating deficit of US$15.6 million. After taking into account actuarial gain on the defined benefit pension scheme and investment losses the resulting net movement in funds was a reduction of US$13.6 million. The level of unrestricted income received was approximately US$4 million less than forecast primarily due to the strength of the US dollar versus donor currencies and the expenditure in excess of income levels was funded using approved designated funds (US$2m million). This resulted in a decrease in general reserves to US$21.9 million and a fall in designated reserves to US$73.3 million.

Financial Statement 2015 cover
Resource

| 17 June 2016

Financial Statement 2015

IPPF’s total income has fallen by US$10.0 million from US$126.2 million to US$116.2 million. This reduction is due to a fall in unrestricted government income of US$5.8 million, a reduction of restricted government income of US$6.2 million and reduced donations in kind of US$0.6 million offset by an increase in restricted grants from multilaterals of US$4m with the balance of US$0.9 million decrease in other income and trading activities. The total decrease is split between restricted and unrestricted funds by US$2.3 million and US$7.6 million respectively. With the exception of Norway and Japan, all government (more significantly Australia and Sweden) donors have held level or increased their unrestricted funding to IPPF in the donor currency. However the strengthening of the US dollar has had a significant impact, effectively reducing US dollar unrestricted income by approximately 14% on a like for like basis compared to 2014. Total expenditure has decreased from US$137.5 million to US$131.8 million. Unrestricted expenditure has risen from US$84.2 million to US$85.6 million while restricted expenditure has fallen from US$53.3 million to US$46.2 million. The increase in unrestricted expenditure is driven by an exchange loss (US$1.9 million) and the use of US$8.9m designated funds to provide support in a number of areas: support in South Asia for system strengthening (US$2.3m); support for resource mobilization at regional and central level (US$1.5 million); campaign and advocacy for UN Liaison office (US$0.9 million); scale up fund for SGBV support to MAs (US$0.5 million); contingency spend on various activities (US$0.4 million). Restricted expenditure levels are driven by the timing of donor funded programmes, which vary on a year-by-year basis. This has resulted in an unrestricted net operating expenditure of US$13.4 million before other unrecognized gains and losses and a restricted deficit of US$2.1 million, to generate a total operating deficit of US$15.6 million. After taking into account actuarial gain on the defined benefit pension scheme and investment losses the resulting net movement in funds was a reduction of US$13.6 million. The level of unrestricted income received was approximately US$4 million less than forecast primarily due to the strength of the US dollar versus donor currencies and the expenditure in excess of income levels was funded using approved designated funds (US$2m million). This resulted in a decrease in general reserves to US$21.9 million and a fall in designated reserves to US$73.3 million.

Financial Statement
Resource

| 17 June 2015

Financial Statement 2014

Financial Statements for 2014 Executive Summary IPPF’s total income has fallen by US$10.0 million from US$136.1 million to US$126.1 million. This reduction is due to a fall in unrestricted government income of US$2.2 million, a reduction of restricted government income of US$8.0 million and reduced donations in kind of US$2.2 million offset by an increase in restricted grants from multilaterals of US$2.9 million. The total decrease is equally split between unrestricted and restricted income at US$5 million each. With the exception of Australia, all government donors have held level or increased their unrestricted funding to IPPF in the donor currency. However the strengthening of the US dollar has had a significant impact, effectively reducing US dollar unrestricted income by approximately 9% on a like for like basis compared to 2013. Total expenditure has risen from US$132.8 million to US$137.6 million. Unrestricted expenditure has risen from US$76.8 million to US$84.3 million while restricted expenditure has fallen from US$56.0 million to US$53.3 million. The increase in unrestricted expenditure is driven by an exchange loss (US$3.6 million) and the use of designated funds to provide support in a number of areas: support in South Asia for system strengthening (US$1.7 million); provision of support to Member Associations (MAs) to scale up services (US$0.9 million); development of the new strategic framework (US$0.4 million); international advocacy and supporting IPPF Vision 2020 campaign to place sexual reproductive health (SRH) and rights at the centre of the sustainable development agenda (US$0.8 million); and support for resource mobilization at a regional and central level (US$1.4 million). Restricted expenditure levels are driven by the timing of donor funded programmes, which vary on a year-byyear basis. This has resulted in an unrestricted deficit of US$4.6 million before other unrecognized gains and losses and a restricted deficit of US$6.9 million, to generate a total operating deficit of US$11.5 million. After taking into account actuarial losses on the defined benefit pension scheme the resulting net movement in funds was a reduction of US$15.1 million. The level of unrestricted income received was as forecast in the 2014 budget and the expenditure in excess of income levels was funded using approved designated funds (US$6.4 million). This resulted in a small increase in general reserves to US$24.0 million and a fall in designated reserves to US$85.9 million.   "The unrestricted funding that our major donors have provided to us over the long term has enabled the Federation’s Member Associations to build sustainable programmes of delivery and advocacy impacting positively the lives of millions of people."

Financial Statement
Resource

| 17 June 2015

Financial Statement 2014

Financial Statements for 2014 Executive Summary IPPF’s total income has fallen by US$10.0 million from US$136.1 million to US$126.1 million. This reduction is due to a fall in unrestricted government income of US$2.2 million, a reduction of restricted government income of US$8.0 million and reduced donations in kind of US$2.2 million offset by an increase in restricted grants from multilaterals of US$2.9 million. The total decrease is equally split between unrestricted and restricted income at US$5 million each. With the exception of Australia, all government donors have held level or increased their unrestricted funding to IPPF in the donor currency. However the strengthening of the US dollar has had a significant impact, effectively reducing US dollar unrestricted income by approximately 9% on a like for like basis compared to 2013. Total expenditure has risen from US$132.8 million to US$137.6 million. Unrestricted expenditure has risen from US$76.8 million to US$84.3 million while restricted expenditure has fallen from US$56.0 million to US$53.3 million. The increase in unrestricted expenditure is driven by an exchange loss (US$3.6 million) and the use of designated funds to provide support in a number of areas: support in South Asia for system strengthening (US$1.7 million); provision of support to Member Associations (MAs) to scale up services (US$0.9 million); development of the new strategic framework (US$0.4 million); international advocacy and supporting IPPF Vision 2020 campaign to place sexual reproductive health (SRH) and rights at the centre of the sustainable development agenda (US$0.8 million); and support for resource mobilization at a regional and central level (US$1.4 million). Restricted expenditure levels are driven by the timing of donor funded programmes, which vary on a year-byyear basis. This has resulted in an unrestricted deficit of US$4.6 million before other unrecognized gains and losses and a restricted deficit of US$6.9 million, to generate a total operating deficit of US$11.5 million. After taking into account actuarial losses on the defined benefit pension scheme the resulting net movement in funds was a reduction of US$15.1 million. The level of unrestricted income received was as forecast in the 2014 budget and the expenditure in excess of income levels was funded using approved designated funds (US$6.4 million). This resulted in a small increase in general reserves to US$24.0 million and a fall in designated reserves to US$85.9 million.   "The unrestricted funding that our major donors have provided to us over the long term has enabled the Federation’s Member Associations to build sustainable programmes of delivery and advocacy impacting positively the lives of millions of people."

publication cover
Resource

| 06 May 2015

IPPF's Strategic Framework: 2016-2022

  Strategic Framework 2016–2022 is a bold and aspirational vision of what the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) plans to achieve, and how we will achieve it, over the next seven years. It is the culmination of an extensive global consultative process involving Member Associations, partners and donors, and was approved by IPPF’s highest decision-making body, the Governing Council, in November 2014. Our strategy responds to social, political and demographic global trends. These include: the expectations and potential of the largest ever generation of young people; ongoing, significant social and economic inequalities, including discrimination against girls and women; and opposition that threatens gains in human rights. It is also guided by evaluations and analyses of our work – strengths, weaknesses, capacities, resources and networks. IPPF’s Strategic Framework sets the priorities that will allow the Federation to deliver impact as a sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) movement over the next seven years. It will guide national Member Associations and partners in formulating their own country-specific strategies, based on their resources and tailored to serve the most marginalized groups in local contexts. It also provides focus to the Secretariat in its international influencing and in its support to Member Associations. Progress in delivering the Strategic Framework will be measured through a dashboard of global results and Member Associations will report on these indicators on an annual basis. With this essential tool, IPPF is equipped to move forward and deliver on its promises. At the helm of the sexual and reproductive health and rights movement, we will help unite the actions and achievements of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) champions around the world to realize a step change in sexual and reproductive health and rights around the world.

publication cover
Resource

| 06 May 2015

IPPF's Strategic Framework: 2016-2022

  Strategic Framework 2016–2022 is a bold and aspirational vision of what the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) plans to achieve, and how we will achieve it, over the next seven years. It is the culmination of an extensive global consultative process involving Member Associations, partners and donors, and was approved by IPPF’s highest decision-making body, the Governing Council, in November 2014. Our strategy responds to social, political and demographic global trends. These include: the expectations and potential of the largest ever generation of young people; ongoing, significant social and economic inequalities, including discrimination against girls and women; and opposition that threatens gains in human rights. It is also guided by evaluations and analyses of our work – strengths, weaknesses, capacities, resources and networks. IPPF’s Strategic Framework sets the priorities that will allow the Federation to deliver impact as a sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) movement over the next seven years. It will guide national Member Associations and partners in formulating their own country-specific strategies, based on their resources and tailored to serve the most marginalized groups in local contexts. It also provides focus to the Secretariat in its international influencing and in its support to Member Associations. Progress in delivering the Strategic Framework will be measured through a dashboard of global results and Member Associations will report on these indicators on an annual basis. With this essential tool, IPPF is equipped to move forward and deliver on its promises. At the helm of the sexual and reproductive health and rights movement, we will help unite the actions and achievements of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) champions around the world to realize a step change in sexual and reproductive health and rights around the world.