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A client in Botswana
programme

| 01 October 2020

ACCESS

  About In a world increasingly affected by natural disasters, prolonged conflict, economic and political crises, and disease outbreaks, there is an urgent need for new models and innovative ways for advancing sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR). The Approaches in Complex and Challenging Environments for Sustainable SRHR (ACCESS) Consortium will produce a set of scalable, evidence-based, participatory approaches that support and engage marginalised and under-served populations in complex and challenging environments to claim and access comprehensive sexual and reproductive health (SRH) information and services. Ensuring that all people are able to enjoy their sexual and reproductive health and rights by 2030 requires progress on reaching the most under-served and marginalised populations, including those living in humanitarian settings and other contexts where social disadvantage intersects with oppressive political, climatic, or conflict situations.  The COVID-19 pandemic is a real example which is having a devastating impact around the world, adding to the existing difficulties experienced by women and girls and marginalised populations, and weakening already fragile health systems. Without action, conditions will worsen – rising insecurity may cause conflict and place a further strain on SRH services. Our partners Funded with UK aid from the UK government and led by IPPF, the consortium is comprised of Frontline AIDS, Internews, the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, The Open University, and the Women’s Refugee Commission. By leveraging each partner’s comparative strengths, ACCESS will develop a set of evidence-based tools and models that can be adapted and transferred to a range of settings for an improved, community-led SRHR response. By working with diverse communities in diverse settings in Lebanon, Mozambique, Nepal and Uganda in collaboration with IPPF Member Associations, ACCESS will co-design and test innovative solutions that enable the most marginalised and under-served people to access comprehensive, evidence-based sexual and reproductive health (SRH) information and services. Compounded by COVID-19, each country has unique circumstances: Lebanon, which hosts a huge number of refugees, including 1.5 million refugees from Syria and multi-generational Palestinian refugees who have been in camps and settlements for decades, straining the relatively small health system. Mozambique, which is in the recovery phase after the devastation of Cyclones Idai and Kenneth in 2019, and is vulnerable to the effects of recurrent natural disasters in the context of extreme poverty and low levels of development. Nepal, which experienced a devastating earthquake in 2016 and has been working to build resilience to prepare for the impact of climate-driven hazards.  Uganda, which faces multiple challenges, including natural hazards, large influxes of refugees from unstable bordering countries, and a restrictive SRHR policy environment. Our impact Through a participatory process that works with communities to identify their SRHR needs, barriers and priorities, as well as to create, test, and refine innovative solutions, ACCESS will contribute to advancing universal SRHR through four outputs:  Resilience: Communities prone to destabilising events, including natural disasters and the effects of protracted conflicts, are better prepared for SRH response and recovery.   Quality Services: Innovative, evidence-based service delivery modalities improve the availability, accessibility, and responsiveness of quality SRH services for communities in complex and challenging environments.   Agency and Equity: Marginalised populations have increased awareness of their sexual and reproductive rights and increased agency to demand and access SRHR information and services, with the support of an enabling environment.   Influence: Evidence generated from the project influences and impacts policy and practice across the humanitarian-development continuum. Publications IPPF Comprehensive HIV Services Package   Facilitator’s Kit: Community Preparedness for Reproductive Health and Gender   Unpacking power dynamics in research and evaluation on social accountability for sexual and reproductive health and rights   Methods to measure effects of social accountability interventions in reproductive, maternal, newborn, child, and adolescent health programs: systematic review and critique   Preparing humanitarians to address ethical problems   Covid-19 in humanitarian settings: addressing ethics to reduce moral distress In April 2021, IPPF received formal notification of the FCDO’s decision to terminate the grant to the ACCESS Consortium. The project closes on 31 December 2021.​

A client in Botswana
programme

| 01 October 2020

ACCESS

  About In a world increasingly affected by natural disasters, prolonged conflict, economic and political crises, and disease outbreaks, there is an urgent need for new models and innovative ways for advancing sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR). The Approaches in Complex and Challenging Environments for Sustainable SRHR (ACCESS) Consortium will produce a set of scalable, evidence-based, participatory approaches that support and engage marginalised and under-served populations in complex and challenging environments to claim and access comprehensive sexual and reproductive health (SRH) information and services. Ensuring that all people are able to enjoy their sexual and reproductive health and rights by 2030 requires progress on reaching the most under-served and marginalised populations, including those living in humanitarian settings and other contexts where social disadvantage intersects with oppressive political, climatic, or conflict situations.  The COVID-19 pandemic is a real example which is having a devastating impact around the world, adding to the existing difficulties experienced by women and girls and marginalised populations, and weakening already fragile health systems. Without action, conditions will worsen – rising insecurity may cause conflict and place a further strain on SRH services. Our partners Funded with UK aid from the UK government and led by IPPF, the consortium is comprised of Frontline AIDS, Internews, the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, The Open University, and the Women’s Refugee Commission. By leveraging each partner’s comparative strengths, ACCESS will develop a set of evidence-based tools and models that can be adapted and transferred to a range of settings for an improved, community-led SRHR response. By working with diverse communities in diverse settings in Lebanon, Mozambique, Nepal and Uganda in collaboration with IPPF Member Associations, ACCESS will co-design and test innovative solutions that enable the most marginalised and under-served people to access comprehensive, evidence-based sexual and reproductive health (SRH) information and services. Compounded by COVID-19, each country has unique circumstances: Lebanon, which hosts a huge number of refugees, including 1.5 million refugees from Syria and multi-generational Palestinian refugees who have been in camps and settlements for decades, straining the relatively small health system. Mozambique, which is in the recovery phase after the devastation of Cyclones Idai and Kenneth in 2019, and is vulnerable to the effects of recurrent natural disasters in the context of extreme poverty and low levels of development. Nepal, which experienced a devastating earthquake in 2016 and has been working to build resilience to prepare for the impact of climate-driven hazards.  Uganda, which faces multiple challenges, including natural hazards, large influxes of refugees from unstable bordering countries, and a restrictive SRHR policy environment. Our impact Through a participatory process that works with communities to identify their SRHR needs, barriers and priorities, as well as to create, test, and refine innovative solutions, ACCESS will contribute to advancing universal SRHR through four outputs:  Resilience: Communities prone to destabilising events, including natural disasters and the effects of protracted conflicts, are better prepared for SRH response and recovery.   Quality Services: Innovative, evidence-based service delivery modalities improve the availability, accessibility, and responsiveness of quality SRH services for communities in complex and challenging environments.   Agency and Equity: Marginalised populations have increased awareness of their sexual and reproductive rights and increased agency to demand and access SRHR information and services, with the support of an enabling environment.   Influence: Evidence generated from the project influences and impacts policy and practice across the humanitarian-development continuum. Publications IPPF Comprehensive HIV Services Package   Facilitator’s Kit: Community Preparedness for Reproductive Health and Gender   Unpacking power dynamics in research and evaluation on social accountability for sexual and reproductive health and rights   Methods to measure effects of social accountability interventions in reproductive, maternal, newborn, child, and adolescent health programs: systematic review and critique   Preparing humanitarians to address ethical problems   Covid-19 in humanitarian settings: addressing ethics to reduce moral distress In April 2021, IPPF received formal notification of the FCDO’s decision to terminate the grant to the ACCESS Consortium. The project closes on 31 December 2021.​

WISH programme clients.
programme

| 04 October 2019

Women’s Integrated Sexual Health (WISH)

WISH is a flagship programme to scale up support to integrated sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) services in countries across Africa and Asia by 2021. Funded by the UK Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO). 

WISH programme clients.
programme

| 04 October 2019

Women’s Integrated Sexual Health (WISH)

WISH is a flagship programme to scale up support to integrated sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) services in countries across Africa and Asia by 2021. Funded by the UK Foreign Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO). 

Social Enterprise
programme

| 11 July 2018

Social Enterprise Acceleration Programme

IPPF is committed to supporting Member Associations to develop social enterprise activities for the purpose of generating income, diversifying funding sources and, ultimately, achieving organizational and financial sustainability. IPPF understands social enterprise as using entrepreneurial methods to generate a surplus income, which is used to finance activities that enable the organization to fulfil its social mission. Member Associations have been engaging in social enterprise for decades. Activities include sale of services, commodities, training and others. In 2017, a survey to map social enterprise among the Member Associations showed that, across IPPF, social enterprise activities contribute up to 24% of the total income in 54 Member Associations, between 25% - 49% in 11 Member Associations, 50% - 74% in 14 Member Associations, between 75% - 99% in 13 Member Associations and 100% in one Member Association. Eight Member Associations reported income of US$ 1 million and above from the sale of specialized health and clinical services whereas five Member Associations raised more than US$ 1 million from commodity sales. Read more in our report: in English; Spanish; Arabic or French.   In 2015, IPPF established the Social Enterprise Acceleration Programme (SEAP) aimed at strengthening the capacity of Member Associations to apply entrepreneurial best practices in the health sector while delivering social value and improving lives. SEAP has supported the establishment and growth of social enterprises of Member Associations with the following objectives:  Accelerate the development of Member Associations towards achieving financial sustainability and maximizing social impact. Provide Member Associations with high quality technical advice to support the effective development and delivery of sustainable sexual and reproductive health interventions through social enterprise. Share key insights and best practices within the Federation and provide access to external networks of support and market opportunities. The coordination of SEAP is currently carried out by the Social Enterprise Hub managed by the Family Planning Association of Sri Lanka. The Social Enterprise Hub is responsible for SEAP’s grant management, enhancing awareness on social enterprising, project monitoring, capacity building, documentation of learnings and provision of technical assistance and training.  Watch our social enterprise video, get familiar with our social enterprise capability statement, read our 2018/2019 MA project stories and download our country-specific resources on providing effective technical guidance.  You can also get in touch by email if you have any queries or would like to know more information: [email protected]   

Social Enterprise
programme

| 11 July 2018

Social Enterprise Acceleration Programme

IPPF is committed to supporting Member Associations to develop social enterprise activities for the purpose of generating income, diversifying funding sources and, ultimately, achieving organizational and financial sustainability. IPPF understands social enterprise as using entrepreneurial methods to generate a surplus income, which is used to finance activities that enable the organization to fulfil its social mission. Member Associations have been engaging in social enterprise for decades. Activities include sale of services, commodities, training and others. In 2017, a survey to map social enterprise among the Member Associations showed that, across IPPF, social enterprise activities contribute up to 24% of the total income in 54 Member Associations, between 25% - 49% in 11 Member Associations, 50% - 74% in 14 Member Associations, between 75% - 99% in 13 Member Associations and 100% in one Member Association. Eight Member Associations reported income of US$ 1 million and above from the sale of specialized health and clinical services whereas five Member Associations raised more than US$ 1 million from commodity sales. Read more in our report: in English; Spanish; Arabic or French.   In 2015, IPPF established the Social Enterprise Acceleration Programme (SEAP) aimed at strengthening the capacity of Member Associations to apply entrepreneurial best practices in the health sector while delivering social value and improving lives. SEAP has supported the establishment and growth of social enterprises of Member Associations with the following objectives:  Accelerate the development of Member Associations towards achieving financial sustainability and maximizing social impact. Provide Member Associations with high quality technical advice to support the effective development and delivery of sustainable sexual and reproductive health interventions through social enterprise. Share key insights and best practices within the Federation and provide access to external networks of support and market opportunities. The coordination of SEAP is currently carried out by the Social Enterprise Hub managed by the Family Planning Association of Sri Lanka. The Social Enterprise Hub is responsible for SEAP’s grant management, enhancing awareness on social enterprising, project monitoring, capacity building, documentation of learnings and provision of technical assistance and training.  Watch our social enterprise video, get familiar with our social enterprise capability statement, read our 2018/2019 MA project stories and download our country-specific resources on providing effective technical guidance.  You can also get in touch by email if you have any queries or would like to know more information: [email protected]lanka.org   

A woman receiving an antenatal check up in West Ambae, Vanuatu
programme

| 31 March 2017

SPRINT: Sexual and reproductive health in crisis and post-crisis situations

The SPRINT Initiative provides one of the most important aspects of humanitarian assistance that is often forgotten when disaster and conflicts strike: access to essential life-saving sexual and reproductive health services. We build capacity of humanitarian workers to deliver essential life-saving sexual and reproductive health services in crisis and post-crisis situations through the delivery of the Minimum Initial Service Package (SRH) for reproductive health in emergencies.   Through funding from the Australian Government's Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) our SPRINT Initiative has brought sexual and reproductive health to the humanitarian agenda, increased capacity and responded to a number of humanitarian emergencies. Australia has funded the SPRINT initiative since 2007 and has supported reaching 1,138,175 people to date and continues to respond to ongoing emergencies.   In each priority country, we work with an IPPF Member Association to coordinate and implement SPRINT activities. Through these partnerships, SPRINT helps strengthen the enabling environment, improve national capacity and provide lifesaving services during times of crisis.   You can read more about the SPRINT Initiative and IPPF Humanitarian’s Programme here.   Australian Government's Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT)      Australia's location in the Indo-Pacific provides us with a unique perspective on humanitarian action. Australia is committed to helping partner governments manage crisis response themselves. This is done through building the capacity of the national government and civil society to be able to respond to disaster. DFAT also works with experienced international partners to prepare for and respond to disasters, including other donors, United Nations agencies, the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement and non-government organisations.  

A woman receiving an antenatal check up in West Ambae, Vanuatu
programme

| 31 March 2017

SPRINT: Sexual and reproductive health in crisis and post-crisis situations

The SPRINT Initiative provides one of the most important aspects of humanitarian assistance that is often forgotten when disaster and conflicts strike: access to essential life-saving sexual and reproductive health services. We build capacity of humanitarian workers to deliver essential life-saving sexual and reproductive health services in crisis and post-crisis situations through the delivery of the Minimum Initial Service Package (SRH) for reproductive health in emergencies.   Through funding from the Australian Government's Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) our SPRINT Initiative has brought sexual and reproductive health to the humanitarian agenda, increased capacity and responded to a number of humanitarian emergencies. Australia has funded the SPRINT initiative since 2007 and has supported reaching 1,138,175 people to date and continues to respond to ongoing emergencies.   In each priority country, we work with an IPPF Member Association to coordinate and implement SPRINT activities. Through these partnerships, SPRINT helps strengthen the enabling environment, improve national capacity and provide lifesaving services during times of crisis.   You can read more about the SPRINT Initiative and IPPF Humanitarian’s Programme here.   Australian Government's Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT)      Australia's location in the Indo-Pacific provides us with a unique perspective on humanitarian action. Australia is committed to helping partner governments manage crisis response themselves. This is done through building the capacity of the national government and civil society to be able to respond to disaster. DFAT also works with experienced international partners to prepare for and respond to disasters, including other donors, United Nations agencies, the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement and non-government organisations.  

Safe Abortion Action Fund
programme

| 30 March 2017

Safe Abortion Action Fund

The Safe Abortion Action Fund (SAAF) was established in 2006, in response to the US government's Global Gag Rule, as a multi‑donor mechanism to support global abortion‑related programming. Hosted by IPPF, SAAF provides small grants to locally-run organisations that promote safe abortion and prevent unsafe abortion through advocacy and awareness raising, service delivery and research activities, and has supported such projects for over a decade. SAAF Supports projects run by IPPF Member Associations as well as other organisations not affiliated with IPPF. By the end of 2016 SAAF had provided US$43 million funding to 188 projects in over 62 countries. SAAF focuses on the needs of the marginalized and most vulnerable women and girls. By visibly funding projects using an international funding mechanism, SAAF works to destigmatize abortion and to legitimize the abortion debate. For more information about the fund visit the SAAF website www.saafund.org.

Safe Abortion Action Fund
programme

| 30 March 2017

Safe Abortion Action Fund

The Safe Abortion Action Fund (SAAF) was established in 2006, in response to the US government's Global Gag Rule, as a multi‑donor mechanism to support global abortion‑related programming. Hosted by IPPF, SAAF provides small grants to locally-run organisations that promote safe abortion and prevent unsafe abortion through advocacy and awareness raising, service delivery and research activities, and has supported such projects for over a decade. SAAF Supports projects run by IPPF Member Associations as well as other organisations not affiliated with IPPF. By the end of 2016 SAAF had provided US$43 million funding to 188 projects in over 62 countries. SAAF focuses on the needs of the marginalized and most vulnerable women and girls. By visibly funding projects using an international funding mechanism, SAAF works to destigmatize abortion and to legitimize the abortion debate. For more information about the fund visit the SAAF website www.saafund.org.

IPPF Japan Trust Fund
programme

| 30 March 2017

Japan Trust Fund

The Japan Trust Fund (JTF) represents a visionary partnership that began in 2000 between the Government of Japan and IPPF. Together, we invest in programmes that prioritize health equity, gender equality, and human security for all. Traditionally a driving force behind IPPF's efforts to support the integrated HIV prevention programmes of our Member Associations in Africa and Asia, JTF has adjusted to reflect changing global health priorities. We attach importance to universal access to sexual and reproductive health and rights - an essential contributor to universal health coverage and the global development goals.     These projects have transformed the lives of people most vulnerable to HIV and high risk of maternal and child mortality. Equally, it ensures that as a donor, the GOJ’s response to HIV remains people-centred and contributes to human security.      

IPPF Japan Trust Fund
programme

| 30 March 2017

Japan Trust Fund

The Japan Trust Fund (JTF) represents a visionary partnership that began in 2000 between the Government of Japan and IPPF. Together, we invest in programmes that prioritize health equity, gender equality, and human security for all. Traditionally a driving force behind IPPF's efforts to support the integrated HIV prevention programmes of our Member Associations in Africa and Asia, JTF has adjusted to reflect changing global health priorities. We attach importance to universal access to sexual and reproductive health and rights - an essential contributor to universal health coverage and the global development goals.     These projects have transformed the lives of people most vulnerable to HIV and high risk of maternal and child mortality. Equally, it ensures that as a donor, the GOJ’s response to HIV remains people-centred and contributes to human security.