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Nepal Medical Abortion

Resources

Latest resources from across the federation and our partners
Cancer Graphic
Resource

| 02 February 2021

IPPF Cervical Cancer Strategy 2020-2024

ABOUT THE PUBLICATION This strategy has been developed to strengthen and expand IPPF Comprehensive Cervical Cancer Prevention (CCCP) work. The IPPF Cervical Cancer Strategy 2020–2024 is underpinned by the principles of inclusiveness, human rights, gender equality, and health equity. This Strategy is prepared with a purpose to clarify IPPF’s pathway to strengthen CCCP in the Federation’s work and ensure women, girls and other affected populations can have access to age-appropriate CCCP information and services.  WHY THE STARTEGY? Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer among women in the world. All countries are affected, particularly low- and middle- income countries (LMICs). In 2018, 85 per cent of the 311,000 deaths from cervical cancer occurred in less developed regions. The higher rates of cervical cancer incidence and mortality in LMICs reflect the limited equitable access to high-quality information, vaccination, screening and treatment, and cancer management in these countries. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the primary cause of cervical cancer. HPV is mainly transmitted through unprotected sexual contact, including skin-to-skin genital contact. Most HPV infections are self-limiting and can be cleared up by the immune system. However, if the infection persists, it may lead to precancerous cervical lesions or even cervical cancer. For people with weakened immune systems, such as those with poorly controlled human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, the risks are far greater. A Comprehensive Cervical Cancer Prevention (CCCP) initiative should include primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention, which is in line with the client-centered and life-course approach.  IPPF’S WORK TOWARDS CERVICAL CANCER ELIMINATION To reduce HPV transmission and contribute to the elimination of cervical cancer, IPPF provides CCCP to save lives, strengthen health equity, address stigma and harmful social/gender norms that create barriers to access of timely and high-quality services, and fulfil the sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) of all people. Addressing cervical cancer and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) transmission is a core part of IPPF’s mandate and is included within the Integrated Package of Essential Services (IPES).  IPPF acknowledges that cervical cancer can affect any individual with a cervix – including women, girls, transgender men, non-binary and intersex people – referred to as affected populations in this Strategy.   

Cancer Graphic
Resource

| 02 February 2021

IPPF Cervical Cancer Strategy 2020-2024

ABOUT THE PUBLICATION This strategy has been developed to strengthen and expand IPPF Comprehensive Cervical Cancer Prevention (CCCP) work. The IPPF Cervical Cancer Strategy 2020–2024 is underpinned by the principles of inclusiveness, human rights, gender equality, and health equity. This Strategy is prepared with a purpose to clarify IPPF’s pathway to strengthen CCCP in the Federation’s work and ensure women, girls and other affected populations can have access to age-appropriate CCCP information and services.  WHY THE STARTEGY? Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer among women in the world. All countries are affected, particularly low- and middle- income countries (LMICs). In 2018, 85 per cent of the 311,000 deaths from cervical cancer occurred in less developed regions. The higher rates of cervical cancer incidence and mortality in LMICs reflect the limited equitable access to high-quality information, vaccination, screening and treatment, and cancer management in these countries. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the primary cause of cervical cancer. HPV is mainly transmitted through unprotected sexual contact, including skin-to-skin genital contact. Most HPV infections are self-limiting and can be cleared up by the immune system. However, if the infection persists, it may lead to precancerous cervical lesions or even cervical cancer. For people with weakened immune systems, such as those with poorly controlled human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, the risks are far greater. A Comprehensive Cervical Cancer Prevention (CCCP) initiative should include primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention, which is in line with the client-centered and life-course approach.  IPPF’S WORK TOWARDS CERVICAL CANCER ELIMINATION To reduce HPV transmission and contribute to the elimination of cervical cancer, IPPF provides CCCP to save lives, strengthen health equity, address stigma and harmful social/gender norms that create barriers to access of timely and high-quality services, and fulfil the sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) of all people. Addressing cervical cancer and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) transmission is a core part of IPPF’s mandate and is included within the Integrated Package of Essential Services (IPES).  IPPF acknowledges that cervical cancer can affect any individual with a cervix – including women, girls, transgender men, non-binary and intersex people – referred to as affected populations in this Strategy.   

Resource

| 24 December 2020

Enabling Abortion Services During COVID-19

In order to capture the innovative approaches implemented by SAR Member Associations (MAs) for safe abortion services amid COVID19, IPPF SARO & CO team have collated questions and answers (Q&As) which can serve as a practical guidance to the other MAs across the federation. 

Resource

| 24 December 2020

Enabling Abortion Services During COVID-19

In order to capture the innovative approaches implemented by SAR Member Associations (MAs) for safe abortion services amid COVID19, IPPF SARO & CO team have collated questions and answers (Q&As) which can serve as a practical guidance to the other MAs across the federation. 

Resource

| 24 December 2020

ICPD+25 Nairobi Summit Commitment Analysis Report: Asia & Pacific Analysis

2020 marked a year on from the Nairobi Summit on ICPD+25. Last year’s summit brought together governments, civil society, academia, the private sector, faith-based organizations, international financial institutions, grassroots organizations and other partners interested in the pursuit of sexual and reproductive health and rights. In order to contribute to the implementation and accountability of this at the national level, this year we published ICPD+25 Nairobi Summit Report: A Roadmap for Fulfilling the Promise in multiple languages – download the complete report or a summary to learn more.  

Resource

| 24 December 2020

ICPD+25 Nairobi Summit Commitment Analysis Report: Asia & Pacific Analysis

2020 marked a year on from the Nairobi Summit on ICPD+25. Last year’s summit brought together governments, civil society, academia, the private sector, faith-based organizations, international financial institutions, grassroots organizations and other partners interested in the pursuit of sexual and reproductive health and rights. In order to contribute to the implementation and accountability of this at the national level, this year we published ICPD+25 Nairobi Summit Report: A Roadmap for Fulfilling the Promise in multiple languages – download the complete report or a summary to learn more.  

nepal floods image
Resource

| 11 December 2020

Quick Reference for the Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP) for Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH)

This document provides a "cheat sheet" from which professionals and those working in the field can quickly reference and recall the objectives and actions included in the Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP) for Sexual and Reproductive Health. It is currently available in English and Hindi on IPPF Website and in French, Portuguese and Spanish on Quick Reference for the Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP) for Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) | Inter-Agency Working Group on Reproductive Health in Crises (iawg.net)   

nepal floods image
Resource

| 11 December 2020

Quick Reference for the Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP) for Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH)

This document provides a "cheat sheet" from which professionals and those working in the field can quickly reference and recall the objectives and actions included in the Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP) for Sexual and Reproductive Health. It is currently available in English and Hindi on IPPF Website and in French, Portuguese and Spanish on Quick Reference for the Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP) for Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) | Inter-Agency Working Group on Reproductive Health in Crises (iawg.net)   

tara goes to clinic
Resource

| 04 December 2020

Understanding abortion, a visual resource

This resource aims to fill a gap in communication, reducing literacy and language barriers around abortion messaging. It can be used with a range of different audiences, including people with learning disabilities, to support the audience in the process of making an informed and consensual decision. The purpose of this is to support community health workers, young people, and others advocating for an increase in knowledge and information on abortion and reducing stigma surrounding these issues. We hope the story told here can support and be a resource for those who require more information and may need to access safe abortion services. This resource can be used on its own or alongside other IPPF resources around abortion, such as the ‘How to talk about abortion: a guide to rights based messaging’ or ‘How to educate about abortion: A guide for peer educators, teachers and trainers’. In addition, IPPF have produced videos on ‘What is a surgical abortion’ and ‘What is a medical abortion’. Publication information / Acknowledgements This guide was published in November 2020. It was developed by the Packard Abortion Stigma project team at the IPPF Central Office in London and illustrated by Public Health Illustrator, Ian Kloster. The creation process of this guide incorporated valuable feedback and insights from trained health workers, disability rights advocates and reproductive rights activists. The creators gratefully acknowledge the following organizations and individuals who provided contributions and/or reviewed the guide: IPPF Secretariat team, Change-Advonet, 2+abortions Worlwide, IBIS, Lend A Voice Africa, Dr. Gisela Berger, Sherlina Nageer and David Towell. IPPF gratefully acknowledges the support of the David and Lucile Packard Foundation in developing and disseminating this guide.

tara goes to clinic
Resource

| 04 December 2020

Understanding abortion, a visual resource

This resource aims to fill a gap in communication, reducing literacy and language barriers around abortion messaging. It can be used with a range of different audiences, including people with learning disabilities, to support the audience in the process of making an informed and consensual decision. The purpose of this is to support community health workers, young people, and others advocating for an increase in knowledge and information on abortion and reducing stigma surrounding these issues. We hope the story told here can support and be a resource for those who require more information and may need to access safe abortion services. This resource can be used on its own or alongside other IPPF resources around abortion, such as the ‘How to talk about abortion: a guide to rights based messaging’ or ‘How to educate about abortion: A guide for peer educators, teachers and trainers’. In addition, IPPF have produced videos on ‘What is a surgical abortion’ and ‘What is a medical abortion’. Publication information / Acknowledgements This guide was published in November 2020. It was developed by the Packard Abortion Stigma project team at the IPPF Central Office in London and illustrated by Public Health Illustrator, Ian Kloster. The creation process of this guide incorporated valuable feedback and insights from trained health workers, disability rights advocates and reproductive rights activists. The creators gratefully acknowledge the following organizations and individuals who provided contributions and/or reviewed the guide: IPPF Secretariat team, Change-Advonet, 2+abortions Worlwide, IBIS, Lend A Voice Africa, Dr. Gisela Berger, Sherlina Nageer and David Towell. IPPF gratefully acknowledges the support of the David and Lucile Packard Foundation in developing and disseminating this guide.

Resource

| 29 September 2020

What does IPPF Humanitarian dignity kit include?

IPPF’s Strategic Framework 2016-2022 commits the organisation to lead a locally-owned globally connected movement that provides and enables services, and champions sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) for all. Dignity Kits provide essential personal items for women in emergency situations and items are customized for women in different regions.

Resource

| 29 September 2020

What does IPPF Humanitarian dignity kit include?

IPPF’s Strategic Framework 2016-2022 commits the organisation to lead a locally-owned globally connected movement that provides and enables services, and champions sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) for all. Dignity Kits provide essential personal items for women in emergency situations and items are customized for women in different regions.

Cancer Graphic
Resource

| 02 February 2021

IPPF Cervical Cancer Strategy 2020-2024

ABOUT THE PUBLICATION This strategy has been developed to strengthen and expand IPPF Comprehensive Cervical Cancer Prevention (CCCP) work. The IPPF Cervical Cancer Strategy 2020–2024 is underpinned by the principles of inclusiveness, human rights, gender equality, and health equity. This Strategy is prepared with a purpose to clarify IPPF’s pathway to strengthen CCCP in the Federation’s work and ensure women, girls and other affected populations can have access to age-appropriate CCCP information and services.  WHY THE STARTEGY? Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer among women in the world. All countries are affected, particularly low- and middle- income countries (LMICs). In 2018, 85 per cent of the 311,000 deaths from cervical cancer occurred in less developed regions. The higher rates of cervical cancer incidence and mortality in LMICs reflect the limited equitable access to high-quality information, vaccination, screening and treatment, and cancer management in these countries. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the primary cause of cervical cancer. HPV is mainly transmitted through unprotected sexual contact, including skin-to-skin genital contact. Most HPV infections are self-limiting and can be cleared up by the immune system. However, if the infection persists, it may lead to precancerous cervical lesions or even cervical cancer. For people with weakened immune systems, such as those with poorly controlled human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, the risks are far greater. A Comprehensive Cervical Cancer Prevention (CCCP) initiative should include primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention, which is in line with the client-centered and life-course approach.  IPPF’S WORK TOWARDS CERVICAL CANCER ELIMINATION To reduce HPV transmission and contribute to the elimination of cervical cancer, IPPF provides CCCP to save lives, strengthen health equity, address stigma and harmful social/gender norms that create barriers to access of timely and high-quality services, and fulfil the sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) of all people. Addressing cervical cancer and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) transmission is a core part of IPPF’s mandate and is included within the Integrated Package of Essential Services (IPES).  IPPF acknowledges that cervical cancer can affect any individual with a cervix – including women, girls, transgender men, non-binary and intersex people – referred to as affected populations in this Strategy.   

Cancer Graphic
Resource

| 02 February 2021

IPPF Cervical Cancer Strategy 2020-2024

ABOUT THE PUBLICATION This strategy has been developed to strengthen and expand IPPF Comprehensive Cervical Cancer Prevention (CCCP) work. The IPPF Cervical Cancer Strategy 2020–2024 is underpinned by the principles of inclusiveness, human rights, gender equality, and health equity. This Strategy is prepared with a purpose to clarify IPPF’s pathway to strengthen CCCP in the Federation’s work and ensure women, girls and other affected populations can have access to age-appropriate CCCP information and services.  WHY THE STARTEGY? Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer among women in the world. All countries are affected, particularly low- and middle- income countries (LMICs). In 2018, 85 per cent of the 311,000 deaths from cervical cancer occurred in less developed regions. The higher rates of cervical cancer incidence and mortality in LMICs reflect the limited equitable access to high-quality information, vaccination, screening and treatment, and cancer management in these countries. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the primary cause of cervical cancer. HPV is mainly transmitted through unprotected sexual contact, including skin-to-skin genital contact. Most HPV infections are self-limiting and can be cleared up by the immune system. However, if the infection persists, it may lead to precancerous cervical lesions or even cervical cancer. For people with weakened immune systems, such as those with poorly controlled human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, the risks are far greater. A Comprehensive Cervical Cancer Prevention (CCCP) initiative should include primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention, which is in line with the client-centered and life-course approach.  IPPF’S WORK TOWARDS CERVICAL CANCER ELIMINATION To reduce HPV transmission and contribute to the elimination of cervical cancer, IPPF provides CCCP to save lives, strengthen health equity, address stigma and harmful social/gender norms that create barriers to access of timely and high-quality services, and fulfil the sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) of all people. Addressing cervical cancer and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) transmission is a core part of IPPF’s mandate and is included within the Integrated Package of Essential Services (IPES).  IPPF acknowledges that cervical cancer can affect any individual with a cervix – including women, girls, transgender men, non-binary and intersex people – referred to as affected populations in this Strategy.   

Resource

| 24 December 2020

Enabling Abortion Services During COVID-19

In order to capture the innovative approaches implemented by SAR Member Associations (MAs) for safe abortion services amid COVID19, IPPF SARO & CO team have collated questions and answers (Q&As) which can serve as a practical guidance to the other MAs across the federation. 

Resource

| 24 December 2020

Enabling Abortion Services During COVID-19

In order to capture the innovative approaches implemented by SAR Member Associations (MAs) for safe abortion services amid COVID19, IPPF SARO & CO team have collated questions and answers (Q&As) which can serve as a practical guidance to the other MAs across the federation. 

Resource

| 24 December 2020

ICPD+25 Nairobi Summit Commitment Analysis Report: Asia & Pacific Analysis

2020 marked a year on from the Nairobi Summit on ICPD+25. Last year’s summit brought together governments, civil society, academia, the private sector, faith-based organizations, international financial institutions, grassroots organizations and other partners interested in the pursuit of sexual and reproductive health and rights. In order to contribute to the implementation and accountability of this at the national level, this year we published ICPD+25 Nairobi Summit Report: A Roadmap for Fulfilling the Promise in multiple languages – download the complete report or a summary to learn more.  

Resource

| 24 December 2020

ICPD+25 Nairobi Summit Commitment Analysis Report: Asia & Pacific Analysis

2020 marked a year on from the Nairobi Summit on ICPD+25. Last year’s summit brought together governments, civil society, academia, the private sector, faith-based organizations, international financial institutions, grassroots organizations and other partners interested in the pursuit of sexual and reproductive health and rights. In order to contribute to the implementation and accountability of this at the national level, this year we published ICPD+25 Nairobi Summit Report: A Roadmap for Fulfilling the Promise in multiple languages – download the complete report or a summary to learn more.  

nepal floods image
Resource

| 11 December 2020

Quick Reference for the Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP) for Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH)

This document provides a "cheat sheet" from which professionals and those working in the field can quickly reference and recall the objectives and actions included in the Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP) for Sexual and Reproductive Health. It is currently available in English and Hindi on IPPF Website and in French, Portuguese and Spanish on Quick Reference for the Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP) for Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) | Inter-Agency Working Group on Reproductive Health in Crises (iawg.net)   

nepal floods image
Resource

| 11 December 2020

Quick Reference for the Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP) for Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH)

This document provides a "cheat sheet" from which professionals and those working in the field can quickly reference and recall the objectives and actions included in the Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP) for Sexual and Reproductive Health. It is currently available in English and Hindi on IPPF Website and in French, Portuguese and Spanish on Quick Reference for the Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP) for Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) | Inter-Agency Working Group on Reproductive Health in Crises (iawg.net)   

tara goes to clinic
Resource

| 04 December 2020

Understanding abortion, a visual resource

This resource aims to fill a gap in communication, reducing literacy and language barriers around abortion messaging. It can be used with a range of different audiences, including people with learning disabilities, to support the audience in the process of making an informed and consensual decision. The purpose of this is to support community health workers, young people, and others advocating for an increase in knowledge and information on abortion and reducing stigma surrounding these issues. We hope the story told here can support and be a resource for those who require more information and may need to access safe abortion services. This resource can be used on its own or alongside other IPPF resources around abortion, such as the ‘How to talk about abortion: a guide to rights based messaging’ or ‘How to educate about abortion: A guide for peer educators, teachers and trainers’. In addition, IPPF have produced videos on ‘What is a surgical abortion’ and ‘What is a medical abortion’. Publication information / Acknowledgements This guide was published in November 2020. It was developed by the Packard Abortion Stigma project team at the IPPF Central Office in London and illustrated by Public Health Illustrator, Ian Kloster. The creation process of this guide incorporated valuable feedback and insights from trained health workers, disability rights advocates and reproductive rights activists. The creators gratefully acknowledge the following organizations and individuals who provided contributions and/or reviewed the guide: IPPF Secretariat team, Change-Advonet, 2+abortions Worlwide, IBIS, Lend A Voice Africa, Dr. Gisela Berger, Sherlina Nageer and David Towell. IPPF gratefully acknowledges the support of the David and Lucile Packard Foundation in developing and disseminating this guide.

tara goes to clinic
Resource

| 04 December 2020

Understanding abortion, a visual resource

This resource aims to fill a gap in communication, reducing literacy and language barriers around abortion messaging. It can be used with a range of different audiences, including people with learning disabilities, to support the audience in the process of making an informed and consensual decision. The purpose of this is to support community health workers, young people, and others advocating for an increase in knowledge and information on abortion and reducing stigma surrounding these issues. We hope the story told here can support and be a resource for those who require more information and may need to access safe abortion services. This resource can be used on its own or alongside other IPPF resources around abortion, such as the ‘How to talk about abortion: a guide to rights based messaging’ or ‘How to educate about abortion: A guide for peer educators, teachers and trainers’. In addition, IPPF have produced videos on ‘What is a surgical abortion’ and ‘What is a medical abortion’. Publication information / Acknowledgements This guide was published in November 2020. It was developed by the Packard Abortion Stigma project team at the IPPF Central Office in London and illustrated by Public Health Illustrator, Ian Kloster. The creation process of this guide incorporated valuable feedback and insights from trained health workers, disability rights advocates and reproductive rights activists. The creators gratefully acknowledge the following organizations and individuals who provided contributions and/or reviewed the guide: IPPF Secretariat team, Change-Advonet, 2+abortions Worlwide, IBIS, Lend A Voice Africa, Dr. Gisela Berger, Sherlina Nageer and David Towell. IPPF gratefully acknowledges the support of the David and Lucile Packard Foundation in developing and disseminating this guide.

Resource

| 29 September 2020

What does IPPF Humanitarian dignity kit include?

IPPF’s Strategic Framework 2016-2022 commits the organisation to lead a locally-owned globally connected movement that provides and enables services, and champions sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) for all. Dignity Kits provide essential personal items for women in emergency situations and items are customized for women in different regions.

Resource

| 29 September 2020

What does IPPF Humanitarian dignity kit include?

IPPF’s Strategic Framework 2016-2022 commits the organisation to lead a locally-owned globally connected movement that provides and enables services, and champions sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) for all. Dignity Kits provide essential personal items for women in emergency situations and items are customized for women in different regions.